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After the first few hours of Mass Effect: Andromeda, I was discouraged–maybe even a little distraught. Within that short span of time, I’d already encountered unconvincing animations, bog standard missions, clunky user interface, stilted dialogue–basically every red flag you hope to avoid when approaching a lengthy shooter-RPG powered equally by action and story.

Thankfully, Andromeda did improve. As I progressed, I unlocked exhilarating new combat options, met characters with deeper appeal than my initial crew, and discovered freely explorable worlds that finally fulfilled the series’ decade-old planet-hopping promise. And yet, some of those early problems persisted throughout, and while I did catch glimmers of the original trilogy’s greatness, that shine was often dulled by lifeless dialogue, tedious missions, and even technical shortcomings.

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To its credit, Andromeda boldly abandons the familiar. In place of the iconic Commander Shepard, we have Ryder, the daughter (or son) of a man chosen to lead one of four arks filled with intergalactic explorers looking to found colonies in a distant star cluster. Several disasters later, Ryder inherits her dad’s job, and while the moments leading to and including that scene are pretty hackneyed, the stakes really sink in once you reach the Nexus–Andromeda’s version of the earlier games’ Citadel.

Here you discover the other three other arks have gone missing and that the Nexus, which arrived ahead of the arks, has suffered every setback imaginable, from growing food shortages to a veritable civil war. With leadership in shambles and no resources to revive the cryogenically frozen colonists, the sudden arrival of an ark immediately lands Ryder in an uncomfortable position of power. In practice, the scenario felt more believable than typical “you are the chosen one” cliches. I understood why those characters would look to me and felt the weight of their desperation. So when the Nexus gradually sprang to life as I started fixing problems,

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